The authenticity industry

Everyday we’re bombarded with messages that testify to be the ‘real’ thing from organic fruit and vegetables, to shampoo, and travel. Even public figures and celebrities are using the label as a way to win us over. Why is authenticity pervasive in popular consumption and why do we crave ‘the real’? Why have advertising executives latched on to authenticity as a way to lure us in and does it work?

The short answer is yes. The long answer is: it’s complicated.

In times of growing political unrest, economic insecurity, and technological advancement, our future in contemporary society seems unpredictable. The destabilization of old certainties, whether they be class, religion, family-ties or state, coupled with the increased movement of people, has resulted in a heightened sense of uncertainty. Authenticity becomes an issue when it is called into question, when a sense of inauthenticity is detected or experienced.

In modern western society, which is increasingly commodified, automated and mediated, life is saturated with toxic levels of inauthenticity. Examples include reality TV shows which are in fact scripted, stores branding themselves as independent when they’re owned by a multinational conglomerate, and sleek photo-shopped images of ‘natural’ women. This leads the public to yearn for the ‘real thing’ in the world around them as well as to seek authenticity in themselves. Authenticity has thus become a highly prevalent feature and concern of modern life.

Corporations and brands have taken notice of this shift and use authenticity as a purposive strategy in their marketing. By conferring authenticity to an object, the consumer is enticed to buy the product by drawing on a broad range of cues that constructs a sense of authenticity that reinforces their desired sense of self. This is a highly effective way of getting us to buy things we don’t really need or want.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Blog at WordPress.com.

Up ↑

%d bloggers like this: